Comic Review: Turbulence by Overtime Comics

In this super awesome blog, I’d like to take the opportunity to introduce you to a new Comic book writer I met at Space City Con by the name of Christ Garrett. Chris works with Overtime Comics, and is the writer and creator of a great comic series called Turbulence and another called Defects. Defects I will review for a later blog.

In accordance with my personal “Moon Sedai Spoiler-Free” policy, I’m going to do my best to review these comics without spoiling the plot, too much. If I do, I apologize.

Comic artists for overtime comics.com
Chris Garrett: on left

Turbulence begins with the story of a young boy whose father was an airline pilot. After his father is brutally killed by hijackers on a plane, the boy becomes obsessed with stopping Bad guys. Turbulence is a “meta.” Metas are people: either good or bad, with super powers.

1-Turbulence 1

In the very first issue, we see Turbulence go through his first “super hero” battle, when he swoops in to save the day. He blunders through it, but manages to stop the “bad guys” from performing their bad deeds. Garrett makes it clear in the series that the titular character is not an established superhero with a catchphrase and reputation: he’s just starting out, learning what it means to be a hero, and how to be heroic. He’s not rich, he’s not famous, he blunders his way through flirting, and he’s just starting out.

Turbulence is being followed, however, by a team of Metas who want to recruit him. The leader of these Metas, Gravnos, is working with the government, hoping to get metas involved with police forces. This will let them stop crime legally, especially crimes performed by other  metas, who are scaring normal people out of the police force.

This is a breakaway from what traditionally happens in super hero tales, where the hero fights crime but must flee before the police get there, lest they be arrested for destroying government property or for vigilantism.

The plot is rather interesting, and intricate. There are layers to the story only hinted at in the existing five issues.

Now, let’s take a look at the art work.

3-turb 4

In the above image, Turbulence is using his powers, coaching himself through a battle. I selected this image to show Turbulence using his powers: he can control the wind. And I really like the swirls of purples and blues used to convey this (as opposed to mini-tornadoes that I’ve seen in other wind-powered comic characters).

The artwork on Turbulence is amazing. For this blog, I have selected a panel from each of the five parts of the story. I really like how well emotions are displayed on the characters.  Eyes are drawn quite well.
5-turb 3

If “a picture is worth a thousand words,” then the story told in the image above? Beautiful and heartbreaking.

Something else I like: The artists are not afraid to draw outside of the panels:
2-turbulence 2

The above is Turbulence angry that his exploits did not make the front page.

And what did I say about eyes and emotion?
4-turbulence 6

Compare this to the earlier picture in this blog: both are Turbulence’s eyes. Both convey worlds of different emotions.

The only problem I see with Turbulence: There’s not enough of it! I want to know about some of the other Metas (many of whom are only mentioned)!

One thing interesting I learned about Chris and the crew at Overtime Comics at Space City Con is that while they make their work available digitally as the books are published, they will not put out a print copy of any work until after the work is “complete.”

So, you can obtain all five issues in print, or purchase them individually as digital copies. The works are available here.

To find out more about Overtime Comics, follow them on Facebook or Twitter.

Comic Review: Turbulence by Overtime Comics Reviewed by on .
4.75

Beautiful Eyes.

Worth 1,000 words
Worth it!
A breakaway from what traditionally happens in super hero tales, where the hero fights crime but must flee before the police get there, lest they be arrested for destroying government property or for vigilantism. The plot is rather interesting, and intricate. There are layers to the story only hinted at in the existing five issues.

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